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Facebook's Zuckerberg To Sue Neighbours In Hawaii, Force Them To Sell Property To Him

Facebook's Zuckerberg To Sue Neighbours In Hawaii, Force Them To Sell Property To Him

Facebook's Zuckerberg To Sue Neighbours In Hawaii, Force Them To Sell Property To Him
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will sue hundreds of Hawaiians to compel them to sell him their small plots of land. These plots lie within the 700-acre property that Zuckerberg had purchased on the island of Kauai two years ago for $100 million. 
 
His lawyer filed eight lawsuits on December 30 last year requesting the forced sales at a public auction to the highest bidder, which would allow Zuckerberg to make his secluded beach-front land on the island's north shore even more private, claims an English daily.
 
Members of the "Kuleana families," these property owners are native Hawaiians who inherited the lands passed down from generations without a will or a deed. Kuleana lands are properties that were granted to native Hawaiians in the mid-1800s.
 
The aim behind filing the suits is "to force these families to sell their land at a public court auction to the highest bidder," says the newspaper because the landowners enjoy the right to travel across Zuckerberg's property to get to their land parcels.
 
Meanwhile, Zuckerberg's lawyer said in a statement to CNBC: "It is common in Hawaii to have small parcels of land within the boundaries of a larger tract, and for the title to these smaller parcels to have become broken or clouded over time."
 
Also read: Update: Here's Why Zuckerberg's AI-Powered Home Is For Real
 
Although many defendants hold a tiny fraction of the land, many of whom are dead now. They were given 20 days to respond to the suits, which ended on January 19, 2017.
 
Clearing the air on the issue, in his Facebook message, Zuckerberg wrote: "For most of these folks, they will now receive money for something they never even knew they had. No one will be forced off the land."
 
"We love Hawaii and we want to be good members of the community and preserve the environment. We look forward to working closely with the community for years to come," he added.
 

Meanwhile, University of Hawaii law professor Kapua Sproat, who is originally from Kauai, said: “This is the face of neocolonialism. Even though a forced sale may not physically displace people, it's the last nail in the coffin of separating us from the land.”

“For us, as Native Hawaiians, the land is an ancestor. It's a grandparent,” she added. “You just don't sell your grandmother.”

Last Updated: Mon Jan 30 2017

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